Friday, 7 April 2017

Screw "Modern" Education

I don't know whether I want to punch Jon Platt (the father who lost the Supreme Court Case to take his child out of school during term time to go to Disneyland) in the face or to thank him.

So that is a rather loaded lead sentence so let's break it down.

Platt took his child out of school so he could take them to Disneyland in the US. And here a reader who does not understand the inside of the educational system is going to say: "So what? What could a kid miss that couldn't be made up on their return?"

But the thing is, I DO know what is going to happen. That child will return from a two week holiday and will face the inevitability of comments from classmates.

"Psssst," says one kid, completely ignoring the work his teacher has put in front of him, "Where ya been?"

"My daddy took me to Disneyland. I had a lot of fun." answers Platt Junior, also ignoring the work in front of him PLUS the work s/he didn't do whilst prowling around the Magic Kingdom.

"Oh wow!! I'm going to ask my mum to take me on holiday!" (Have fun with that, mums.)

And then the whole class takes an interest and no one does any work. Of course, the teacher would get the blame for not being able to "control" the class by providing stimulating resources to keep the kiddos entertained.

Then of course, the resentment of teachers comes to the fore. They are the ones who have to plan two weeks ahead to put together a learning pack for Little Platt so s/he doesn't miss any learning that will affect the progress the child is meant to make.

"Did any learning take place?" the teacher asks.

"Oh yes," says Little Platt, "I got to meet Mickey Mouse. And Goofy!"

"Did you do your homework?" the teacher asks.

And either this kid spent 10 minutes zooming through a pack of photocopied worksheets or they wrote a 2 paragraph review of the holiday that begins with "Day One: We got on a plane" and ends with. . .oh, that's it. (By the way. . ."Day One" is the first paragraph and "We got on a plane" counts as the second according to the child).

No learning has taken place. The kid is behind everyone else. And of course, it's all the teachers' fault Little Platt doesn't get the GCSEs s/he deserves. And again, of course, it's the teacher--already responsible for the learning of the OTHER 29 children in HER (because the majority of teachers are female) care--who will have to reproduce all the lessons this one child has missed. And probably during her lunch hour.

But yet the Senior Platt, if he could just get over the idea that a school is not just free babysitting for parents who have to work, raises some rather interesting questions.

Should the government be dictating how a child learns?

Well no. What a great world it would be if kids just wake up wanting to learn all the things teachers have to shove down their unwilling necks before they sit their GCSEs.

But they don't. Teachers have to persuade kids that Mary Shelley and John Steinbeck are the greatest writers the world has ever known. Oh and Carol Ann Duffy, D H Lawrence, Shakespeare, Keats and Robert Browning aren't that bad either. Try doing that after two weeks in Disneyland.

And yet. . .

Mr Platt seems to understand that the best time to take a child on holiday is during term time when fares and everything else are A LOT (two separate words) cheaper. Toss some blame in the direction of travel agencies for being so greedy as to take advantage of the school calendar. But I still DON'T like all his whingeing about the system. If he doesn't want to be a part of the system, he should pay for private tutors.

My rates for private tuition (Skype AstroAlex1984) are £30 per hour. But I reckon I can teach more in one hour than over worked Henrietta, who teaches 240 pupils over a two week period, can teach in a whole term.

It's the outdated, factory model school system that sucks. Not a father who wants his children to see Mickey Mouse.

Want to hear more?

Here's an interview I did with the wonderful Rod Suskin!


 And I'm doing a webinar for the Cosmic Intelligence Agency this weekend. Here's the link to sign up.



About the Astrologer




Alex Trenoweth was voted Best International Astrologer, 2015 for her dynamic presentation on Astrology and Education. Her book, "Growing Pains" is an exciting development in astrology as it combines classroom teaching experience, sound research and the potential to have a positive impact on struggling adolescents, parents, teachers and those who have been labelled "at risk". For queries, consultations or syndications, please contact Alex via www.alextrenoweth.com or leave a message in the comment section.


About the New Book


There are two wolves fighting inside of me, the old story goes, one wolf is good and the other is evil. “But Grandfather,” asked the child, “Which one wins?” The Grandfather answered, “The wolf I feed.”

We might like to think that being good is a natural instinct. In fact, doing the right thing takes a conscious decision. Every day, we are met with temptation to get ahead at the expense of someone else, to get away with something we know is wrong or to cut corners if we think no one is watching.


Following on from her powerful book on astrology and Education, “Growing Pains”, Alex Trenoweth explores the benefits of using “the bad guy” of the solar system: Saturn. Often avoided and seldom understood, if we understand our own Saturn then we can help others to understand theirs. Using case studies of  highly successful people contrasted with convicted serial killers, Trenoweth deftly demonstrates the dire consequences of feeding the wrong wolf.





Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Exam Time for Teachers


The pupil was getting cocky (a by product of Jupiter in Gemini). He was bound for Yale to study Economics but he needed me to help him secure an A/A* for his GCSEs in English Language and Literature. Mum and dad were paying me a small fortune and the kid had been eyeing me up for days: I wasn't Ivy League or Oxbridge or even privately schooled. And this kid thought he could out-do me.
"I'll bet you can't answer a writing question better than I can," he said to me (uh-oh).

My left eyebrow twitched with the effort of preventing itself from raising to the full "Oh really?" position. As it happened, there was a visiting examinations officer who wrote the exam paper in the building. Surely he wouldn't mind offering a second opinion.

So it was on like Donkey Kong.

I sat on one side of the table, the student sat on the other and this is what the test question looked like:

Question 2: Writing
You should spend 45 minutes on this question.

Write on one of the following:

EITHER
a) A magazine has asked its readers to write an article about leadership qualities.
Write an article for the magazine giving your thoughts about what makes a good leader. (15 marks)

OR
b) You have been asked to give a talk to an audience of young people on the following topic:
'Modern technology--has it made our lives better?'

OR
c) Write a story with the title 'The Journey'

'The Journey'

Ella was rinsing ink from the rolling trays with great care. Already it looked as if her nails would never be restored to their natural colour: thick, black ink rimmed her nail beds and she was sorely regretting her idea of letting nine-year-olds artistically express themselves with such a vicious medium.

She let her eyes quickly dart to the finished canvasses. Was it all worth it? The memory of the giggling children told her that on some level, some learning had been achieved--even if they had enjoyed themselves a little too much.

As she was scrubbing the remaining ink for her hands, she noticed a large, black dot of ink had fallen onto her pristine white trainers. Even as she grabbed tissue to blot the ink, she knew it would not be worth the effort: some stains never came out.
___

Ella had not been single long and the habit of wondering what to cook to please her man at home had not yet been broken. Steak or chicken, she thought as she approached the grocery store.

The revulsion of realising she had been thinking of her ex caused her to suddenly stop in the middle of the pavement. With startling force, she was bumped from behind.

"Good job we're not in cars," said the disgruntled walker.

"Oh God," Ella mumbled. "I'm so sorry. I--" but the words dried up on her tongue. What did she want for dinner? Had she become so accustomed to pleasing someone else that she could no longer think of her own desires?

"Are you OK?"

In her reverie, Ella realised she had lost track of time and space. Had she been speaking out loud?

"I was just thinking I wanted chocolate cake," she babbled. "For dinner."

For the first time, Ella took notice of the person who had bumped into her. He was large, hairy, untidy and certainly not the type she would choose to speak to. But he had a glint of merriment in his eyes that made her not mind the other points.

"Long day at work," she smiled. "Totally not with it. I need a holiday."

The man pursed his lips together unattractively. The motion made his lips turn white beneath his unshaven whiskers.

"Let me guess. You're a teacher."

Ella laughed nervously. Was it that obvious?

As if reading her mind, the stranger said: "If the harried expression and the loss of concentration so close to the end of term didn't give it away, then the splodge of ink on your white shoes would have."

With a shrug, Ella smiled and looked shyly to this rogue, this rough stranger who was not her type. Then she turned her attention to acquiring the chocolate cake she wanted for dinner. And she did not mind that she had company--even if, she still told herself, he was definitely not her type.

________

It struck Ella, as she tried to save her ruined shoes later that night, that chocolate cake was not such an odd choice after all. But mooching about feeling sorry for herself was. For the first time in days, Ella was starting to feel as if the world were opening up again instead of caving in on top of her. The journey between then and now could be forgotten. Vanquished. She could turn her back to it all and move on.

And to her surprise, with a little help from bleach, the ink stain faded to a distant memory.

___________

I scored all the points (15). My arrogant pupil scored 13. For a fleeting second, I saw the awe on his face. And then he was ready to get back to work. And so was I. Now to get him those A/A*s.

The things we do for students!!

An A* for me from the person who writes the exam papers


By the way, if you're interested in hearing more about Astrology in Education, I'm doing a webinar with the Cosmic Intelligence Agency on Sunday. Click here to register.


About the Astrologer


Alex Trenoweth was voted Best International Astrologer, 2015 for her dynamic presentation on Astrology and Education. Her book, "Growing Pains" is an exciting development in astrology as it combines classroom teaching experience, sound research and the potential to have a positive impact on struggling adolescents, parents, teachers and those who have been labelled "at risk". For queries, consultations or syndications, please contact Alex via www.alextrenoweth.com or leave a message in the comment section.


About the New Book


There are two wolves fighting inside of me, the old story goes, one wolf is good and the other is evil. “But Grandfather,” asked the child, “Which one wins?” The Grandfather answered, “The wolf I feed.”

We might like to think that being good is a natural instinct. In fact, doing the right thing takes a conscious decision. Every day, we are met with temptation to get ahead at the expense of someone else, to get away with something we know is wrong or to cut corners if we think no one is watching.


Following on from her powerful book on astrology and Education, “Growing Pains”, Alex Trenoweth explores the benefits of using “the bad guy” of the solar system: Saturn. Often avoided and seldom understood, if we understand our own Saturn then we can help others to understand theirs. Using case studies of  highly successful people contrasted with convicted serial killers, Trenoweth deftly demonstrates the dire consequences of feeding the wrong wolf.





Friday, 30 December 2016

Ted Bundy and Penny Jordan: Power Games

Ted Bundy and his time twin, the English romance novelist Penny Jordan, were both born on 24 November 1946 with Jupiter in Scorpio and Saturn in Leo. Although their angles would be different (unfortunately I don't have Penny's time of birth but I do have Ted's) and the degree of the Moon would be different (but in the sign of Sagittarius), they would share significant astrological similarities. So how does one turn into one of the most prolific and frightening necrophiles with an estimated 200 victims and the other become one of Mills and Boons most prolific romantic authors with over 200 books to her credit?

To answer that, let's have a look the easiest difference: Ted was born a boy and Penny was born a girl. From the moment we are born, we are conditioned into being a boy or a girl. Everything about the manner in which we are spoken to, played with, or the people we are encouraged to interact with, encouraged into a career or the clothes we are given to wear are acts of conditioning. There is even a difference with astrology: for men, we tend to look at Mars and for girls, we tend to look at Venus (I just want to say I'm glad we're moving away from this tendency as a society. It has been a topic astrologers have talked about amongst themselves for quite some time). My point is, there are external forces that shape behaviour on the simplest level.

Let's take another easy difference: Penny grew up in a family who encouraged her to read and create stories as she was learning to read and write. By contrast, Ted grew up in an odd household with a violent father and severely depressed mother--and just about the time of his second Jupiter return, he discovered these parents were in fact his grandparents. His "sister" was his true mother and the identity of his biological father never known.

So on top of this male/female difference, Ted grew up in a household with dark secrets. But just like Penny, Ted has 4 planets (including Chiron) in his natal chart plus three planets in Sagittarius. But Penny, given her circumstances, was able to use what was in her birth chart to take a completely different path to Ted. Going back to Ted's odd family, his mother had given birth out of wedlock and thus Ted was a source of shame for the whole family. Does anyone think that Ted would not be affected by this in some way? This boy who would grow up to be a man who got away with murder, rape and necrophilia for years because he was such an incredibly meticulous researcher and who explored every detail of ways to carry out his crimes? He was perceptive and aware. Even when his "sister"/mother moved away from the grandparents' house around the time of his first Jupiter square and married around the time of his first Jupiter opposition, the pretence that she was his sister persisted. She went on to have more children and although a great effort was made to ensure Ted was included in family outings, the young lad remained distant.

The next question might be around serial killer profiling: there are not many--if any at all--serial killers whose immediate family went to such great lengths to maintain a total lie about a child's basic identity. But then it is not known how many serial killers had the same astrological significators such Jupiter in Scorpio square natal Saturn/Pluto, that would have been triggered in same way as Ted's. This is yet another reason why I don't think you can just look at a birth chart and make a judgment about someone's free will: one HAS to look at the Jupiter and Saturn transits.

Ted's story is a disturbing one and there is such conflicting testimony about his early life that it's hard to say for sure when the killings started to happen. But the earliest suspected murder was at around the time of Ted's first Saturn opposition at the age of 14. Transiting Neptune was conjunct to his natal Jupiter at the same time and it was a murder that fit Ted's circumstances at the time but just couldn't be made to stick with DNA evidence. If Ted began his murdering spree at this age, then it stands to reason that his developing brain would began the pruning down process associated with this age group. Ted was developing the habits of a lifetime.
By the time of their Jupiter return, both Ted and Penny would be settled into the careers that would make them famous.. As Jupiter is in Scorpio for both, it would be interesting to look at the description for this. Although I wrote this for the first Jupiter return, the same premises would be in operation for the second Jupiter return: 

"Secondary school offers these pupils a chance to become involved in every drama going on. Scratch the surface of some commotion, and you’re likely to find they have been involved somehow. For the next drama, you’ll have to scratch even deeper because they are learning the art of evasion. Eventually, you’ll find no trace of their involvement because they’ve set someone else up to be the fall guy. On the flip side, there will inevitably be pupils who are terrified of their own power. They are frightened of change because they have learned that where there is gain, there is a loss attached. Someone they love dies and they inherit money, they meet the love of their life but endure years of abuse (both given and received) or they indulge in their occult fantasies only to be sucked into the abyss. They love mysteries, “unsolvable” puzzles and, pointed in the right direction, they love to research. "

Both Ted and Penny were active in the respective fields from 1974-1978. The majority of his known killings took place in these years and she was writing books that would be published (all at once) in 1979. He was on trial in 1979. Both author and killer were known--in different ways--for their shape  shifting abilities by the time they reached prominence. He had a "generic" style that made it difficult for victims to identify distinguishing features. She used several pseudonyms that served different purposes throughout her writing career. Astrologically what was happening for them in 1979 was that Jupiter was transiting their natal Saturn whilst Uranus was transiting their natal planets in Scorpio.

He was executed on 24 Jan 1989 as Pluto transited his natal stellium in Scorpio. She died on 31 December 2011 as Jupiter opposed their natal Chiron.

But what I find most interesting is that for Ted Bundy, "possession", a Scorpio keyword, was a factor in his motivation to rape, murder and violate after death. And Penny Jordan used the same trait "possession" that is) to describe the "Alpha male" love interests in her novels. She even wrote a book called "Passionate Possessions" as Transit Pluto transited their natal Sun half a Jupiter cycle after he was executed in the electric chair. Whilst not going to the same extremes as Ted, just the titles of her books indicates she has simply re-directed the same themes in a different manner. Other titles of her books include: "The Hard Man", "A Forbidden Loving" and "Power Games". And by the way, I think the man on the front cover of her novel "Power Games" with the tagline of "Power over life, love. ..and death" could bear more than just a passing resemblance to Ted Bundy.


About the Astrologer



Alex Trenoweth is an MA graduate of the Cultural Astronomy and Astrology course at Bath Spa University (2007) and has gained recognition as an outstanding schoolteacher for her tireless and innovative education of adolescents. Her unique expertise in both astrology and teaching, coupled with ground-breaking research, led her to her write Growing Pains, a book aimed at helping parents and teachers support and guide young people into maturity. Alex’s articles have appeared in astrological magazines across the globe and in addition to her many writing accomplishments, she was voted “Best International Astrologer, 2015” by the Krishnamuti Institute of Astrology in India for the energetic presentation of her original and thought-provoking investigation into astrology and education. As of October 2015, Alex is on a world tour, lecturing on a variety of astrological topics and is enjoying meeting other astrologers from different cultures. The articles on serial killers are a part of the case studies that will be presented in her next book due for release later this year.












Sunday, 20 November 2016

20 Ways Teaching Primary School is different to Teaching Secondary School

Guess who won "Class of the Week" two weeks in a row?
"Duh Alex," I hear my teacher friends say, "Did you expect teaching primary school to be the same as teaching secondary school?". Well no I didn't but I really wasn't expecting so many differences.  I'm in a unique position: teachers tend to teach primary school OR secondary school. And, as a devoted secondary school teacher up until a few weeks ago, I feel like the scales have fallen from my eyes.

With my hectic travel schedule, I had been avoiding taking on permanent teaching contracts because, truth be told, I really struggle with jet lag. So when my agency rang me and told me to attend an interview at a Primary School, I was prepared to say "no thank you" at the end of the day.

I mean why on earth would I want to teach primary school children? I'm a secondary school teacher, right?

But at the end of the interview day, the year five class I had been teaching were looking up at me so adoringly that I knew I was in trouble.

"Please stay," one whispered as I tried to make a getaway. "Our last teacher left us when we needed her."

There are times when my Jupiter in Cancer heart just becomes a big bowl of overly eager to please jelly.

Yes, I accepted the job.

On top of being to keen to help, I also thought it would be a great opportunity to study the transition process from primary school to secondary school from a different perspective. I thought teaching these Jupiter in Scorpio/Sagittarius learners would be a piece of cake. And for lots of different reasons, it is easier (but some things are decidedly harder). I thought I would learn something. And on that, I wasn't wrong.

When I taught secondary school, I didn't pay too much mind to what primary schools had to say except when it came to behaviour and pastoral issues. I completely disregarded data because, as every secondary school teacher knows, primary school data is pretty useless. Well I changed my mind on that one.

So here's a little summary (before my time at the internet cafe expires: long story).

1) Primary school kids are tiny. I kept tripping over them!
2) Good God, I have to mark everything they produce (fortunately, it isn't too difficult).
3) Secondary school teachers re-teach an awful lot of stuff that primary school kids already have a very good handle on (yeah, persuasive writing!).
4) I run up and down two flights of stairs seven times a day picking kids up from various places and then dropping them off somewhere else (they aren't allowed to be by themselves at any time).
5) Moderation: the most intense marking and data fury I've ever experienced. And it will be done 4 times over an academic year in a primary school compared to once a year (if we were lucky) in a secondary school.
6) Ha!! No playground or lunch duties for me! Which brings me to. . .
7) I love teaching assistants more than ever! I've always said secondary school teachers need more of them but who listens to me? TAs in primary schools do a lot of the jobs that make teaching secondary school so difficult: they help mark, do admin jobs, help monitor children and help to keep me sane.
8) Another ha! I can wear trainers and jeans every day. BONUS!
9) Boo! No more contraband tea for me. A kettle of boiling water in a primary school classroom is a definite no no.
10) The emotional onslaught of secondary school is none existent in primary school. Primary school children kind of see me as the mother bird of the nest and they trust me to be the sensible one (poor kids). No hormones to worry about :D
11) We're together all day in the same classroom. Already I pretty much know their levels in all subjects and know almost all of their assigned numbers for the data file. So mastering their birthday was a piece of cake.
12) My Year 5 pupils are experiencing their waning Jupiter squares and they're not having any of my wild stories before they start calling me out on them. "Miss, I think you're making that up. That didn't really happen." So my vast store of mythology and Ojibwa legends is rather lost on them.
13) I have to teach across all subjects--who can really imagine me teaching PE?? Well they will leave year 5 having mastered Salutations to the Sun ;)
14) I get to sit on music lessons!! Woohoo! I'm fulfilling a childhood dream to learn to play the cello
15) My "teaching partner" is well cool (and very young) and I think I scared her when I said I won't be taking marking home (that lasted two weekends).
16) Easiest OfSted ever
17) Primary school children are expected to be able to swim 25 meters at the end of year 6. Best bloody idea ever. And we take them to local swimming baths during a normal school day.
18) I feel we are letting our children down more than ever by not recognising all the hard work primary schools do in data tracking and pastoral care.
19) Primary schoolteachers and Secondary schoolteachers need to start listening to each other. There has to be a way of one side informing the other.
20) With a ten minute train journey from my house, I am in receipt of Inner London Weighting! ker-ching!!

I took advantage of the opportunity to ask OfSted a few questions on why there isn't the opportunity for primary schools and secondary schools to work together. As usual, it comes down to an ignorant Education Secretary who has never spent significant time in a classroom since leaving comprehensive education, a lack of interest (also due to ignorance) and a lack of funding.

Tragic really.

On a better note, I will have primary school behaviour data to analyse and add to my research for the Kepler Conference. Can't wait to crunch those numbers.

Oh and I got "Class of the Week" an unprecedented two weeks running. Who says astrology doesn't give a teacher the winning edge?


About the Astrologer


Alex Trenoweth was voted Best International Astrologer, 2015 for her dynamic presentation on Astrology and Education. Her book, "Growing Pains" is an exciting development in astrology as it combines classroom teaching experience, sound research and the potential to have a positive impact on struggling adolescents, parents, teachers and those who have been labelled "at risk". For queries, consultations or syndications, please contact Alex via www.alextrenoweth.com or leave a message in the comment section.


About the New Book


There are two wolves fighting inside of me, the old story goes, one wolf is good and the other is evil. “But Grandfather,” asked the child, “Which one wins?” The Grandfather answered, “The wolf I feed.”

We might like to think that being good is a natural instinct. In fact, doing the right thing takes a conscious decision. Every day, we are met with temptation to get ahead at the expense of someone else, to get away with something we know is wrong or to cut corners if we think no one is watching.


Following on from her powerful book on astrology and Education, “Growing Pains”, Alex Trenoweth explores the benefits of using “the bad guy” of the solar system: Saturn. Often avoided and seldom understood, if we understand our own Saturn then we can help others to understand theirs. Using case studies of  highly successful people contrasted with convicted serial killers, Trenoweth deftly demonstrates the dire consequences of feeding the wrong wolf.




Tuesday, 25 October 2016

Happy Birthday to Hillary Clinton

If you’ve been keeping up with my work, then you know that I have been saying for a long time that the habits of a lifetime are formed between the first Jupiter return and the final Saturn opposition of adolescence. Although I’m no fan of politics, during my recent trip to California to attend the incredible International Society For Astrological Research (ISAR) conference,  I caught POTUS fever and watched all three debates between candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.
My interest in politics plummeted during the 1984 presidential election when I ardently canvassed for Jesse Jackson—who didn’t turn out to be the man I had thought he was (seems to be a theme in my life!).
Anyway, as I watched the debate these past couple of weeks, I have to say I was horrified to see how Trump TRIED to humiliate Clinton. Sometimes women just shine too brightly and they become targets of hate for bullies—especially if they shine brighter than their male competitors. Clinton isn’t perfect but Jesus H Christ I understand a woman who has the vision to support the rights of children and other women. Who better to fly the flag of the vulnerable than someone who has been on that team all her life? It’s time (for lots of different astrological reasons) that patriarchy was turned upside down for a change.
But back to those habits of a lifetime. . .
Our Hillary was already deeply entrenched in politics at the critical age (gotta love those Jupiter in Sagittarius faces!) and Donald Trump was . . . a bully at the time (according to Wikipedia). And for women who think supporting a male bully will endear you to him longer than the five minutes of attention he’s given you—you’ll soon realize your mistake when he moves on to “better” opportunities in an effort to make his own star shine. And if you think women don’t need to fight for their rights for equality, then perhaps you should read this article.
So Happy Birthday to Hillary Clinton! You’re not perfect but we need you in the White House. To celebrate, here’s an extract from Growing Pains!

PS The drawing of Hillary was done by former pupil Waheed Kazemi as part of the requirements for his GCSE Art exam.
As always, All Rights Reserved by Alex Trenoweth, 2013
Hillary’s foray into politics began when she was thirteen and canvassing South Side Chicago in 1960 when she found evidence of electoral fraud against Richard Nixon. During this year, transiting Jupiter began a series of three oppositions to Uranus in Gemini. She was a teacher’s pet and graduated in the top five per cent of her class. She enrolled in the all girls’ college, Wellesley, in 1965 and was the institution’s first student commencement speaker in 1969 as Jupiter was conjunct natal Neptune in Libra.
In the summer of 1973, Saturn was conjunct Uranus in Gemini and she had received her juris doctor degree and had marriage proposed to her by Bill Clinton. She demurred because she was concerned she would lose her identity and become over shadowed by his. Shortly after this, she was a member of the impeachment inquiry staff in Washington during the Watergate scandal. With Saturn opposite her North Node in Capricorn in the summer of 1974, she learned she had failed the District of Columbia bar exam but passed the Arkansas exam. She decided to follow Bill to Arkansas. In the spring of 1975, Jupiter had opposed her Neptune and shortly after, she agreed to marry Bill.
In October 1978, Jupiter began a series of squares to her natal Sun. During this time, she began gambling in cattle futures contracts, a successfully speculative venture that ended when she discovered she was pregnant with her daughter Chelsea as Jupiter was opposite her North Node in July 1979. She had made $100,000 on a $1,000 investment in cattle, but the winnings were to prove a thorn in her side. During this time, she and Bill had also become entangled with the Whitewater Development Corporation.
As Saturn conjoined her Sun in 1983, she was named Arkansas Woman of the Year. In 1992, Bill was made the Democrat candidate for presidency. Saturn in Aquarius made a series of three oppositions to her Mars in Gemini. During this time, it was alleged Bill had had an a air with a nightclub singer. To allay the rumours, they appeared on 60 Minutes together. Bill admitted he had caused pain in his marriage but denied the a air. Although credited for rescuing his campaign, Hillary had caused outrage by seeming to insult women who stay at home baking cookies and having teas. Her appearance drew comparisons to Lady Macbeth.
In 1993, Jupiter was in conjunction with her Neptune when the Clintons took office. Just before the final conjunction, Vince Foster had committed suicide and Hillary had been implicated in removing les on the night of his death. She was also accused of ring White House staff and replacing them with staff from Arkansas, a scandal that became known as Travelgate (perfect for a Jupiter to Neptune transit).
By the end of the year Jupiter was conjunct her Sun. Her ambitious (and contentious) healthcare plan had been proposed earlier that year and had met with such opposition in 1994 that she was forced to wear a bullet-proof vest. She was eventually subpoenaed to appear before the federal grand jury over the Whitewater Development Corporation scandal, the first First Lady to have been ordered to do so. She was eventually cleared of any wrongdoing in 2000 as both Jupiter and then Saturn opposed her natal Jupiter.
During 1998, Saturn and then Jupiter began a series of oppositions to her Sun in Scorpio. During this time, the Lewinsky scandal which again saw Bill in hot water over an extra marital affair had broken out. He was impeached and then acquitted shortly after.
Hillary’s successful bid for State Senate in 2000 took place as Jupiter then Saturn made a series of oppositions to Jupiter’s natal place in Sagittarius.
Hillary has won many awards, particularly for her work with women, children and health. In Gallup polls, she has been named “Most Admired Woman” ten times in a row.

More to come very soon.


About the Astrologer


Alex Trenoweth was voted Best International Astrologer, 2015 for her dynamic presentation on Astrology and Education. Her book, "Growing Pains" is an exciting development in astrology as it combines classroom teaching experience, sound research and the potential to have a positive impact on struggling adolescents, parents, teachers and those who have been labelled "at risk". For queries, consultations or syndications, please contact Alex via www.alextrenoweth.com or leave a message in the comment section.


About the New Book


There are two wolves fighting inside of me, the old story goes, one wolf is good and the other is evil. “But Grandfather,” asked the child, “Which one wins?” The Grandfather answered, “The wolf I feed.”

We might like to think that being good is a natural instinct. In fact, doing the right thing takes a conscious decision. Every day, we are met with temptation to get ahead at the expense of someone else, to get away with something we know is wrong or to cut corners if we think no one is watching.


Following on from her powerful book on astrology and Education, “Growing Pains”, Alex Trenoweth explores the benefits of using “the bad guy” of the solar system: Saturn. Often avoided and seldom understood, if we understand our own Saturn then we can help others to understand theirs. Using case studies of  highly successful people contrasted with convicted serial killers, Trenoweth deftly demonstrates the dire consequences of feeding the wrong wolf.